Wired: Here's the Real Way to Get Internet to the Next 4 Billion

Zoom Wireless Technician, Bernard Oola, installs broadband in Gulu. Zoom Wireless is EveryLayer's customer in Uganda.

Zoom Wireless Technician, Bernard Oola, installs broadband in Gulu. Zoom Wireless is EveryLayer's customer in Uganda.

 

AROUND 3.2 BILLION people have access to the Internet. That’s amazing, but it’s fewer than half of the 7 billion or so people on earth. And while Internet access was once a luxury, it is quickly becoming essential as the world’s commerce, educational resources, and entertainment move online.

Fortunately, there’s no shortage of schemes to bring Internet to underserved countries, ranging from low-orbit satellites to high-altitude balloons to drones. Some analysts have criticized these projects, arguing they won’t deliver Internet access at prices people in the developing world can afford. It’s a bit like trying to make up for a lack of roads by building cars that don’t need them, says Mark Summer of EveryLayer, a Silicon Valley company that helps local ISPs create wireless networks in Africa, the Caribbean, and Southeast Asia. The alternative? Deploy Internet the old-fashioned way.

“It’s not so sexy to build roads, but we’re not going to overcome the challenge of missing infrastructure with flying cars,” he says.

Read the the full article on wired.com